The number of people killed on city streets in 2016 was higher than it had been in 14 years but residents still generally believe Toronto roads are safe for pedestrians, a new poll has found.

The Forum Research poll of 1,090 residents found that 44 per cent believe that the city’s roads are safe for pedestrians compared to 37 per cent who say that the roads are unsafe for pedestrians. A further 20 per cent of respondents were unsure.

Women tended to be more likely to have a negative opinion of road safety in the city with 41 per cent saying they believed that the roads were unsafe for pedestrians compared to 40 per cent who said they were safe.

Income also appeared to be a factor. The poll revealed that those making under $20,000 a year were more likely to believe that the roads were unsafe for pedestrians (48 per cent) than safe (39 per cent). The same was also true among those making between $20,000 and $40,000 a year, though the margin was smaller - 42 per cent believed the roads were unsafe and 37 per cent said they were safe.

The release of the poll comes in the wake of a deadly year in which 43 pedestrians were killed on city streets.

That total was the highest since 2002.

In a press release accompanying the poll, Forum Research President Lorne Bozinoff said the data suggests “most Torontonians still feel safe walking Toronto streets.”

That sentiment, however, may not extend to cyclists.

The poll also asked respondents if they believe that the roads are safe for cyclists and 50 per cent said they were unsafe compared to 34 per cent who said they are safe. A further 15 per cent of respondents were unsure.

Women were again more likely to say that the roads were unsafe with 55 per cent holding that opinion compared to 45 per cent of men.

The poll is considered accurate to within three percentage points, 19 times out of 20.